asylum-art:

Kevin Champeny

Artist on Tumblr | on Facebook

"What Remains"
60” wide x 48” tall x 1” deep
35,000+ hand cast urethane flowers

(via lynxyz)

psych2go:

You can find more posts at psych2go. If you want the sources to the post, you can use a search engine like google and type psych2go -word for word of the fact and you will find our sources. 

(via la-uniceja-de-radamanthys)

casualdorkpatrol:

pukybear:

mindlessbeat:

mindlessswagg143:

YOOO I KNOW IM NOT THE ONLY ONE WHO REMEMBERS THIS SHIT. I JUST FORGOT THE NAME OF THE SHOW AND WHERE ITS FROM

EXACRLY OFG

Amby and Dexter from Nick Jr.   

wait there it is

casualdorkpatrol:

pukybear:

mindlessbeat:

mindlessswagg143:

YOOO I KNOW IM NOT THE ONLY ONE WHO REMEMBERS THIS SHIT. I JUST FORGOT THE NAME OF THE SHOW AND WHERE ITS FROM

EXACRLY OFG

Amby and Dexter from Nick Jr.   

wait there it is

(via ooobvsydu)

ivyarchive:

mymodernmet:

Illustrator Lili Chin's adorable series Dogs of the World illustrates 192 breeds of dogs grouped according to geographical origin.

More:

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(via grandpajumpersandeyelashes)

juicytang:

kumagawa:

this is the strongest vine I ever seen

this is the best vine I’ve ever seen

(via dolldust)

I WANT A LIVE ACTION KENJI HIMURA!!!

hkirkh:

English gets it.

eh… acá les decimos piñas

hkirkh:

English gets it.

eh… acá les decimos piñas

sixpenceee:

HOW THE MOKIN CHILDREN ARE ABLE TO SEE WITH AMAZING CLARITY UNDERWATER

The Mokin are a group in Thailand that are nomadic and have a sea-based culture. 

In the sea there is less light, so usually one’s iris will dilate. But the Mokin have an adaption where instead of dilating, they constrict as much as possible. 

This allows them to see with much better clarity. Recent studies suggest that any child can quickly learn this trick. It exemplifies how well our brain adapts to our environment. 

SOURCE 

You may also like: SWIMMING BABIES

(via sixpenceee)

captainaceofspades:

namiamagawa:

Do not redistribute photographs without permission.

My friend Mizuki and I went to a flower garden in Koma (高麗) today. These are known by so many names. Manjushage (曼珠沙華) is the most common in Japan. Lycoris is the scientific genus, and Red Spider Lily is the most likely English translation. They also bloom in white. You can’t pick the flowers, but the garden staff was selling them at the entrance for pretty cheap.

The lycoris has some rather ominous legends in Chinese and Japanese mythology. They often bloom near cemeteries around the autumnal equinox, so they are said to have a strong connection with the underworld and serve to guide departed souls to their next reincarnation.

Anyway, they’ve been popping up in anime a lot recently, so I figure it would be nice if everyone knew the symbolism behind the flowers. Also, a bonus orb-weaver. Sorry, I like spiders.

*sniff* Madame Red

patsandora:

unbloss:

lepetitchatblanc:


best thing I’ve ever read

NEVER FORGET

holy shit

Love this.

patsandora:

unbloss:

lepetitchatblanc:

best thing I’ve ever read

NEVER FORGET

holy shit

Love this.

(via juenofhotep)